Why Small Business Saturday is Stupid

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I know I might seem like the last person to rag on something like Small Business Saturday, but I have some issues. Last Saturday Morgantown businesses celebrated the “venerated” holiday, but there’s a number of practical and holistic reasons we should abolish the practice altogether. I appreciate the idea but not the execution.

1. The idea that we should only celebrate small businesses one day a year is ignorant. It puts small business in a realm of commemoration alongside things we should care about but habitually tune out – AIDs research and breast cancer awareness are painful examples. Unfortunately, lots of people are numb to these awareness months, barring huge programs like Relay for Life. Associating small business with charity is a bad way to think about our local economy.
What has “awareness” done for anybody? Being “aware” is a lot different than actually taking action. Thanks to Small Business Saturday, people can be “aware” that small businesses exist and shop there once a year.

2. It’s celebrated on the worst possible day of the year. Sure, I see what they tried to do. It’s logical to try and ride the wave of Black Friday shopping, but there’s still a problem here. We’re making small business an afterthought, a place we go after we binge-shop at major chains. People should be lining up outside of local businesses on Black Friday, not visiting the day after when they’re exhausted and presumably broke. Let’s make it Small Business Black Friday instead.

3. Small Business Saturday promotes the trivialization of small businesses. When American Express started the tradition of recognizing small businesses they had good intentions, but the fact we need this kind of day identifies our failure to recognize how important small business are. Small businesses are the cornerstone of our world. More than half of the working population (like 120 million people) work in small businesses. Small businesses have generated 65 percent of new jobs since ’95. There are 28 million small businesses in the United States.
Those stats are nothing to shake a stick at. Saying we need a “day of commemoration” makes small businesses sound like a small, marginalized part of the business world, which is far from true. If we want to fix our cultural perspective on small businesses we need more than just a day of celebration – we need entire years of recognition. We should all respect our local business owners for what they do and shop locally everyday – it’s the key for making our community vibrant and strong.

Europe’s had this figured out for ages. Their small businesses aren’t just vibrant – they’re sexy. As a result, chains have trouble catching on, and every community has a unique business environment. Let’s get on the bandwagon.

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Cafe de Flore, Paris. Photo by Damien Roue.

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3 thoughts on “Why Small Business Saturday is Stupid

  1. Bryan,

    I NEVER thoroughly considered these factors and how they play into the execution of Small Business Saturday. Now that you’ve pointed it out, I don’t know how anyone with a brain couldn’t realize that it is a rip off to make this day happen so close to Black Friday. On the other hand, it would beneficial to show numbers about how many people come out and take part in Small Business Saturday; maybe it’s not as bad as it seems.

  2. This was definitely an interesting look into Small Business Saturday. There were a lot of factors that I never really thought about. I figured one factor would be to support them constantly and not just on one day. It is also quite interesting to see that this day is placed so close to Black Friday. Since this day is pretty much the opposite of that.

  3. Fair but a little light. As I’ve cautioned before, be careful with claims like “lots of people” without substantiation. Especially when you’re taking a stance, your sourcing must be meticulous if you want the work to hold up in the face of the challenges it’s likely to draw.

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