The Daily Athenaeum’s List of Influential People is All-White and All-Male

So yesterday the Daily Athenaeum, WVU’s official school newspaper, had an article on the front page of their paper  listing the “Top 5 Most Influential Persons of 2013.”

Gee, I wonder who is #1?

Gee, I wonder who is #1?

The list includes outgoing WVU President Jim Clements, Student Body President Ryan Campione, baseball coach Randy Mazey, Athletic Director Oliver Luck, and Mountaineer Mascot John Kimble. As you might be able to tell, the list is very white and very male and very sports-oriented. Rightfully so, people had a problem with this.

It all started when someone from WVU’s Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion called out the DA’s list on Twitter.

In case you hadn’t noticed already, @paigelav points out the issue.

But there’s so much more than that:

https://twitter.com/ddryan/status/410541126190256128

And the internet has a field day.

https://twitter.com/maryowlice/status/410448756354473984

The user on the Office’s Twitter then offers an alternative list.

Some of the choices are stellar:

Franklin D. Cleckley is a professor at the WVU College of Law who graduated with a Master of Laws from Harvard. He was the only African-American to sit on the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals from 1994-1996.

Frances Silva is a senior forward on the WVU’s Women’s Soccer Team. She was the 2013 Big XII Offensive Player of the Year and led the team to victory in the Big XII Championship (the only championship WVU has won this year, so far.)

Brian Jara is a faculty member in the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies. It looks like he’s published some papers this year and presented them at the National Women’s Studies Association Conference in Cincinnati.

– Deb Beazley is a Senior Program Coordinator of Sexual Assault Prevention at the Health Sciences Center. She’s been teaching sexual assault prevention classes since ’98 and coordinates High Expectations, an experiential learning program for students cited for drug or alcohol abuse.

– Elaine McMillion is an award-winning documentary storyteller who graduated from WVU’s P.I. Reed School of Journalism. Her most recent project, an interactive documentary called Hollow, explores the issues of rural Appalachia through the eyes of people living there.

– Narvel Weese is WVU’s Vice President for Administration and Finance. Weese oversees the University’s finances, facilities, human resources – basically everything involving WVU funds. 2013 has been a busy year for him, considering WVU’s recent expansions and growing pains.

– Ruth Kershner oversees Student Affairs for the School of Public Health and teaches in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Her bio says she’s presented at local, state and national conferences on issues of health concerns and violence in the lives of women.

What’s true is this – when it comes to most visible, everybody on the DA’s list is well-known. I’m only familiar with one person on the suggested list, but the beauty of a top-5 list is the chance to recognize less-visible people who have made an impact. Although he’s an influential guy who deserves it, Clements has gotten enough limelight already.

While people are quick to point out the “WASP-y” nature of the DA’s list, think about the circumstances influencing the editors. I assume the list was put together late at night, which is validated by the clear typo in Ryan Campione’s name. Do you make quality work when you’re on a deadline? It’s also not surprising the list is sports-centric, considering the influence of the DA’s sports editors. They must have influence – why else would the paper spend thousands to send reporters to away football games when our own band can’t attend?

These circumstances don’t justify the DA’s monochromatic, single-sex list (nothing will) but they do explain it. Hopefully the feedback will give the editors pause. They’re funded by WVU student fees, an oft-fleeting source of income for school papers, and could make the DA a national-award-winning paper like it used to be. Now they just make national headlines for gaffes.

Edited, 12:16 AM 12/11 – Full disclosure – I worked at the DA for two years. I left in April.

Edited, 12:26 AM 12/11 – Sourced some data about student newspaper budgets after being challenged. Also fixed some typos and style.

Advertisements

Why Small Business Saturday is Stupid

8328457694_fb4b8f3c75_b

I know I might seem like the last person to rag on something like Small Business Saturday, but I have some issues. Last Saturday Morgantown businesses celebrated the “venerated” holiday, but there’s a number of practical and holistic reasons we should abolish the practice altogether. I appreciate the idea but not the execution.

1. The idea that we should only celebrate small businesses one day a year is ignorant. It puts small business in a realm of commemoration alongside things we should care about but habitually tune out – AIDs research and breast cancer awareness are painful examples. Unfortunately, lots of people are numb to these awareness months, barring huge programs like Relay for Life. Associating small business with charity is a bad way to think about our local economy.
What has “awareness” done for anybody? Being “aware” is a lot different than actually taking action. Thanks to Small Business Saturday, people can be “aware” that small businesses exist and shop there once a year.

2. It’s celebrated on the worst possible day of the year. Sure, I see what they tried to do. It’s logical to try and ride the wave of Black Friday shopping, but there’s still a problem here. We’re making small business an afterthought, a place we go after we binge-shop at major chains. People should be lining up outside of local businesses on Black Friday, not visiting the day after when they’re exhausted and presumably broke. Let’s make it Small Business Black Friday instead.

3. Small Business Saturday promotes the trivialization of small businesses. When American Express started the tradition of recognizing small businesses they had good intentions, but the fact we need this kind of day identifies our failure to recognize how important small business are. Small businesses are the cornerstone of our world. More than half of the working population (like 120 million people) work in small businesses. Small businesses have generated 65 percent of new jobs since ’95. There are 28 million small businesses in the United States.
Those stats are nothing to shake a stick at. Saying we need a “day of commemoration” makes small businesses sound like a small, marginalized part of the business world, which is far from true. If we want to fix our cultural perspective on small businesses we need more than just a day of celebration – we need entire years of recognition. We should all respect our local business owners for what they do and shop locally everyday – it’s the key for making our community vibrant and strong.

Europe’s had this figured out for ages. Their small businesses aren’t just vibrant – they’re sexy. As a result, chains have trouble catching on, and every community has a unique business environment. Let’s get on the bandwagon.

Image

Cafe de Flore, Paris. Photo by Damien Roue.

Should We Kick PNC Out of the Mountainlair?

4573726238_0fe54ca9a7_z

There’s been some pretty heavy debate on campus recently: PNC Bank’s five year contract with WVU has expired, and there’s been some serious disagreement about whether the bank should get another contract. Environmental groups on campus are upset with the Bank’s past behavior, while supporters argue for the Bank’s versatility and service. Currently, the contract to be WVU’s banking partner is up the air – should we give it to PNC again? 

Let’s weigh our options.

Reasons to Kick PNC Out

1. PNC has given loans to companies that fund Mountaintop Removal – in essence, PNC has helped fund the destruction of West Virginia. In 2011, PNC wrote loans to some of the largest coal companies in the U.S.: Patriot Coal, Consol Energy, and Arch Coal are a few examples. All of them use Mountaintop Removal, a high-impact form of mining that has a disastrous effect on the environment. MTR ruins streams, pollutes groundwater, destroys animal habitat and damages the health of local residents. By flattening mountaintops these companies are destroying West Virginia’s ecosystem. The irony is worse given West Virginia’s status as “The Mountain State” – do we want to allow a bank complicit in this destruction to make money off of WVU?

2. With the end of this contract, we have a rare opportunity to change WVU’s bank. I’m willing to bet the next contract will last another five years, and if we sign with PNC again, that’s another five years we’ll have to wait to get rid of them. Let’s capitalize on this opportunity. There are people at WVU who agree with me – last March the Sierra Student Coalition at WVU organized protests outside the Mountainlair against PNC. Let’s strike while the iron is hot.

3. West Virginia University is the flagship educational institution in this state – what kind of message are we sending if we take money from a bank like PNC? Besides the Mountaintop Removal issue, PNC is a Pittsburgh-based company. Why should we use them and funnel money to a bank outside West Virginia when there’s options like MVB and United that are WV-based? If we have PNC as our bank, we’re showing local banks that we don’t care about them. Should West Virginia University, the pride and joy of West Virginia, partner with an out-of-state bank that funds the destruction of our mountains? Even the Student Goverment Association at WVU gets somewhere between $40,000 and $52,000 for their budget from PNC’s rent payments for the Lair location. Bad juju.

Reasons to Keep PNC Bank

1. As the fifth-largest in the U.S., PNC is a powerful bank with national reach. There are PNC locations all over the eastern U.S. As a result, students coming from several states away can be sure they have a relevant bank. Students starting their first bank accounts with PNC here know that when they go home to New York, Ohio or New Jersey that they’ll have a bank there. Their parents will also be able to put funds in their accounts – we all know how important that is. If we keep PNC, WVU will be more appealing to students from far away. As we know, that’s WVU’s goal – look at our move to the Big 12 Conference.

2. PNC provides lots of excellent services to customers, especially students. The bank is no stranger to students – there are PNCs at more than 100 colleges and universities across eight states. With financial planning resources and flexible student accounts, PNC makes it easy for students to learn the ropes of banking. Plus, the organization offers super easy online and mobile banking, a must for modern times. But it’s not just about banking  – WVU outsources many financial services to PNC, including financial aid reimbursement checks. PNC is well-established and is a great choice for students – that’s probably how they won that first contract in the first place.

3. If we kick out PNC for idealistic reasons, can we be sure another bank can handle the workload? Currently, WVU outsources a lot of financial work to PNC, including the issuing of reimbursement checks. That’s millions of dollars a year transferred, cashed out, and deposited in, on and around WVU. Also, PNC operates a bank location in the Mountainlair and maintains ATMs at WVU campuses all across the state. Can we be sure another smaller bank can handle PNC’s workload? PNC is well established and their methods are sound. A smaller replacement bank might not have the resources to handle WVU’s complex demands, which could be bad for students. A lot of things hosted by the Mountainlair – Mountaineer Week, Homecoming, UpAllNight – benefit directly from PNC’s payments to WVU. Many students base their livelihood off refund checks – can we afford to risk a potential delay in issuing them?

What do you think? Should we keep PNC? Leave a comment or tweet at me. You can also come and speak your voice at the WVUSGA meetings every Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. in Hatfield’s B of the Mountainlair. 

So we can argue whatever we like about PNC, but how is the University responding?

Normally, if a contract ends and the University is interested in finding another partner, they’ll begin the Request For Proposal process, and potential clients (in this case, banks) would bid on the job. Each potential partner would offer services at the lowest cost, and the University would pick the bank that wins. It’s basically like an anonymous silent auction where the University picks the winner. The RFP’s are usually open and up for the public to see – the RFP for the bank spot is not online yet. This may be because the committee overseeing the contract process hasn’t met yet, considering the anonymous student on the board was appointed by SGA late last week.

Or… WVU may be withholding the open RFP because they’re trying to make a behind-the-scenes deal. It’s no secret that United Bank definitely donates massive amounts of money to WVU, especially to the athletic department. I’m sure those kinds of donations could win brownie points when it comes to business deals. Maybe WVU is courting exclusive competitors in private – which one can come up with a sweeter deal for the University?

Whatever happens, I hope it’s in the best interests of the University, the students, and our state.

Rainforest Action Network on Flickr.

Rainforest Action Network on Flickr.